How to Make Elderberry Syrup

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how to make elderberry syrup

We got very lucky this year and didn’t really get sick until last week! We all came down with congestion and cough. I guess the conventional protocol would be to give my daughter a decongestant and Tylenol but I would never use any of that stuff. Running the humidifier and diffusing some essential oils really helped all of us but the thing that really helped us get over it fast was elderberry syrup. You can buy it in the store but its much cheaper and healthier to make it yourself. The recipe makes a lot and costs much less then the tiny bottles you can buy pre-made. Also, making it yourself you can make it with raw honey which has added health benefits. The store bought bottle is made with cane sugar which isn’t beneficial at all.

How to make Elderberry Syrup:

1 cup dried elderberries, this is where I get mine
4 cups filtered water
1 cup raw honey
A 1-qt. mason jar with lid

Put the elderberries and water in a pot and heat until boiling. Once it boils let it cook for 3 minutes. Turn off the heat and let it steep for 15 minutes in the pot.

Strain the liquid and pour into the mason jar. Let the liquid sit until completely cooled and then stir in the raw honey. To make it a thicker syrup, use equal parts honey to elderberry juice. Store in the refrigerator.

It’s a pretty easy recipe and saves a lot of money!

 

Comments

  1. Clover Brodie via Facebook says

    I don’t know much about elderberry but can I use it for my 2 year old?
    The recipe calls for honey, is the a substitute I could use to be suitable to give my 9 month old?

    • says

      It lasts a long time but must be refrigerated. We use ours up quickly though – usually within a month. Should last longer then that though as long as its cold.

  2. Jamie Urbanawiz via Facebook says

    Making the syrup as we speak. Just out of curiosity, what do you do with the elderberries after you’ve strained the liquid? If there’s another use for them, that would be great. If not, they’ll do just fine in the compost bin, I’m sure. :)

    • says

      I’ve wondered that as well. I did some reading on it a while back and found out that you’re not supposed to consume the berries themselves just the extract so I’ve always just composted them. Thanks for asking!

      • Beth Hite says

        Eating the berries themselves are poisonous without cooking them. We have them in plenty here in Kansas and Oklahoma

  3. Jamie Urbanawiz via Facebook says

    Thanks for the info! I’ve only ever had it in tea, so it never occurred to me that it wouldn’t be safe otherwise. That will teach me about not reading up on things first!

  4. Jeannette Hernandez says

    Hi, I followed the instructions on making my own Elderberry Elixir I used less honey then advised it’s and it’s watery not thick at all is that normal? and becuase I didn’t use 1 cup of honey or more is the difference? i’m trying to avoid any kind of sweetness if I can i still put a little but even 1/2 a cup. Thanks

    • says

      Yes that’s normal, especially if you used less honey. Some honey is thicker then others and the end result is not as thick as a conventional syrup you would buy at the store, it is thinner then that. The more honey you use the thicker it is…but that is not necessary

  5. Cheryl Johnson says

    I made elderberry juice this summer from the abundance of fresh elderberries in my yard. I canned it in 8-oz mason jars. Can I use the prepared juice in this recipe? Anything I’d change?

Trackbacks

  1. […] on the hunt for ways to protect ourselves.   I think I’m going to try to make a batch of Elderberry Syrup like the recipe I found over at The Holistic Mama site.  I hope it protects us.  Otherwise we […]

  2. […] Elderberry syrup is my daughter’s favorite remedy because it tastes really good. It’s easy to make and it only requires 3 ingredients (one being water). There are many different recipes for Elderberry Syrup. It can be as simple as elderberries, water, and honey or other herbs and essential oils can be added to give it even more power. I was reading in an eBook from The Ultimate Healthy Living Bundle this week called DIY Natural Remedies by Nina Nelson that she adds ginger to her syrup and I thought that was a great idea because of the warming effect of ginger. Warming herbs and spices help to break up congestion and help the nasal passages to drain. Sometimes I add rose hips to my concoction because it is very high in vitamin C. Also, essential oils like lemon or thieves (a Young Living blend) can be added once the syrup is made to enhance it even further. […]

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